Monthly Archives: February 2014


Dear Readers,

The feedback from Power of words 1..means the message went in, So I have written another post as follow up on the initial post.

One day, an expert in time management was speaking to a group of business students and, to drive home a point, used an illustration those students will never forget.

As he stood in front of the group of high-powered overachievers he said,
“Okay, time for a quiz” and he pulled out a one-gallon, wide-mouth mason jar and set it on the table in front of him. He also produced about a dozen fist-sized rocks and carefully placed them, one at a time, into the jar.
When the jar was filled to the top and no more rocks would fit inside, he asked, “Is this jar full?” Everyone in the class yelled, “Yes.”

The time management expert replied, “Really?” He reached under the table and pulled out a bucket of gravel. He dumped some gravel in and shook the jar causing pieces of gravel to work themselves down into the spaces between the big rocks. He then asked the group once more, “Is the jar full?”

By this time the class was on to him. “Probably not,” one of them answered.
“Good!” he replied. He reached under the table and brought out a bucket of sand. He started dumping the sand in the jar and it went into all of the spaces left between the rocks and the gravel. Once more he asked the question, “Is this jar full?” “No!” the class shouted.

Once again he said, “Good.” Then he grabbed a pitcher of water and began to pour it in until the jar was filled to the brim. Then he looked at the class and asked, “What is the point of this illustration?”
One eager beaver raised his hand and said, “The point is, no matter how full your schedule is, if you try really hard you can always fit some more things in it!”

“No,” the speaker replied, “that’s not the point. The truth this illustration teaches us is: If you don’t put the big rocks in first, you’ll never get them in at all.”

What are the ‘big rocks’ in your life, time with your loved ones, your faith, your education, your dreams, a worthy cause, teaching or mentoring others?

Remember to put these big rocks in first or you’ll never get them in at all.

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Sanusi Lamido’s SACKED traveling documents seized by SSS at MMI Airport

Sanusi Lamido

19 September 2009, BREAKING NEWS CBN Governor Sanusi Lamido sacks Bank MDs. 20th February 2014, BREAKING NEWS CBN Governor Suspended, Sacked.

This news looks similar only that the sacker has been sacked. I can only imagine the grin on faces of those he sacked and those who lost jobs during his tenure, I have read mixed comments from different quarters and it only gets funnier. The political terrain is so exciting I wonder how it would play out in 2015 proper.

In other news……

Officials of the State Security Service, SSS, have seized the travelling documents of suspended Governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria, Sanusi Lamido Sanusi, shortly after he arrived Lagos from Niger, where he had gone to attend a meeting of governors of central banks in the West African sub-region.

Shortly after his plane landed at the ExecuJet Terminal of the Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos, he was accosted by plain clothe operatives who detained him briefly and insisted he must surrender his passport.
They also insisted that he would not be allowed to leave the airport until the Lagos state director of the SSS arrives.

But after a while, the operatives had a change of heart after communicating with their superiors. The CBN governor was allowed to leave but only after his passport was confiscated.

PREMIUM TIMES had earlier exclusively reported the plans to arrest Mr. Sanusi on his return to the country from neighboring Niger.

The governor was suspended in absentia, while attending a three-day meeting of the West African Central Bank Governors.

The embattled governor had himself became aware of the plan to arrest him, compelling him to change his travel plans. He landed in Lagos instead of Abuja.

In Lagos, Mr. Sanusi’s associates and friends, led by a former Minister of the Federal Capital Territory, Nasir El-Rufai, were on hand to receive him at the airport.

They drove out of the airport in a convoy heading towards Ikoyi. A member of the delegation said Mr. Sanusi was heading to a friend’s place to relax

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Credit Direct Limited is a licensed non-bank finance company. Established in 2007, the company offers unsecured micro-loans for general purposes, asset based financing to purchase household and commercial items and also to accommodate certain segments of the market that are averse to interest bearing loans.

Over time the company has dominated the micro lending space in Nigeria with presence in 24 states and over 50 outlets. Credit Direct Limited is taking a step into the next phase of business with the introduction of new products like Quick Asset Loans, Pay day Loans, and our flagship product Sharp Sharp Loans.

In December 2013, Credit Direct Limited carried out a brand refreshment exercise to further strengthen the brand, maintain their leading market position, whilst increasing their clientele locally as well as nationally and widening their target market. The exercise sees a redesign of the company Logo and its pantone colours, a review of the company’s corporate Identity manual, a review of the company’s vision and mission statement. This exercise is aimed at strengthening the brand essence and growing the brands equity. Far more than just a Logo, the new corporate identity has been designed to ensure that Credit Direct Limited continues to be at the forefront of the Nigerian Micro-lending market. The company is on a definitive mission to build a strong African presence in order to reinforce that leadership position whilst constantly striving to find better ways to service customers and drive growth.

Our Benzene ring has been a robust symbol of strength and security establishing the organization as a clear leader in the financial services industry and as such we have retained it, however we have re-ignited it with a few more enhancements that communicate trend and evolution. Our core value proposition is speed “Delivering loans in less than 24hours” we have included 2 arrows pointing 45 degrees as a sign of projectile. Credit Direct Limited is poised to deliver excellent products with accompanying customer service. Credit Direct is written in Italics signifying a consistent move. These principles ensure that we continue to develop products and solutions that are customer friendly and also assure customers that we would always put out our best foot for each one of our customer.

Speaking on the official unveil of the new corporate identity, the Managing Director/ Chief Executive Officer Akinwande Ademosu said ‘the new corporate identity is just a small part of the story, our evolved look comes hand in hand with an evolved structure that seamlessly connects all our outlets and departments to further strengthen our business ties with our customers no matter what they need’. He stated that this is an important milestone and the culmination of much hard work from the brand marketing team lead by Joseph Osodi.

The CDL brand refreshment would see a gradual phase out of the old logo, vision and mission statement, and replacement with the new logo, vision and mission statement.

New vision-
“To be the dominant provider of unsecured loans to salaried employees”

New Mission Statement-
“To provide convenient unsecured loans through a highly engaged workforce that delivers superior and sustainable wealth to our shareholder.

With this brand refreshment, Credit Direct Limited has made a strong statement in the industry that the business is moving to the next phase of operations.



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Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on Gay Bill: “The new law that criminalises homosexuality is popular among Nigerians. But it shows a failure of our democracy, because the mark of a true democracy is not in the rule of its majority but in the protection of its minority.”

Chimamanda Adichie

I will call him Sochukwuma. A thin, smiling boy who liked to play with us girls at the university primary school in Nsukka. We were young. We knew he was different, we said, ‘he’s not like the other boys.’ But his was a benign and unquestioned difference; it was simply what it was. We did not have a name for him. We did not know the word ‘gay.’ He was Sochukwuma and he was friendly and he played oga so well that his side always won.

In secondary school, some boys in his class tried to throw Sochukwuma off a second floor balcony. They were strapping teenagers who had learned to notice, and fear, difference. They had a name for him. Homo. They mocked him because his hips swayed when he walked and his hands fluttered when he spoke. He brushed away their taunts, silently, sometimes grinning an uncomfortable grin. He must have wished that he could be what they wanted him to be. I imagine now how helplessly lonely he must have felt. The boys often asked, “Why can’t he just be like everyone else?”

Possible answers to that question include ‘because he is abnormal,’ ‘because he is a sinner, ‘because he chose the lifestyle.’ But the truest answer is ‘We don’t know.’ There is humility and humanity in accepting that there are things we simply don’t know. At the age of 8, Sochukwuma was obviously different. It was not about sex, because it could not possibly have been – his hormones were of course not yet fully formed – but it was an awareness of himself, and other children’s awareness of him, as different. He could not have ‘chosen the lifestyle’ because he was too young to do so. And why would he – or anybody – choose to be homosexual in a world that makes life so difficult for homosexuals?

The new law that criminalizes homosexuality is popular among Nigerians. But it shows a failure of our democracy, because the mark of a true democracy is not in the rule of its majority but in the protection of its minority – otherwise mob justice would be considered democratic. The law is also unconstitutional, ambiguous, and a strange priority in a country with so many real problems. Above all else, however, it is unjust. Even if this was not a country of abysmal electricity supply where university graduates are barely literate and people die of easily-treatable causes and Boko Haram commits casual mass murders, this law would still be unjust. We cannot be a just society unless we are able to accommodate benign difference, accept benign difference, live and let live. We may not understand homosexuality, we may find it personally abhorrent but our response cannot be to criminalize it.
A crime is a crime for a reason. A crime has victims. A crime harms society. On what basis is homosexuality a crime? Adults do no harm to society in how they love and whom they love. This is a law that will not prevent crime, but will, instead, lead to crimes of violence: there are already, in different parts of Nigeria, attacks on people ‘suspected’ of being gay. Ours is a society where men are openly affectionate with one another. Men hold hands. Men hug each other. Shall we now arrest friends who share a hotel room, or who walk side by side? How do we determine the clunky expressions in the law – ‘mutually beneficial,’ ‘directly or indirectly?’

Many Nigerians support the law because they believe the Bible condemns homosexuality. The Bible can be a basis for how we choose to live our personal lives, but it cannot be a basis for the laws we pass, not only because the holy books of different religions do not have equal significance for all Nigerians but also because the holy books are read differently by different people. The Bible, for example, also condemns fornication and adultery and divorce, but they are not crimes.

For supporters of the law, there seems to be something about homosexuality that sets it apart. A sense that it is not ‘normal.’ If we are part of a majority group, we tend to think others in minority groups are abnormal, not because they have done anything wrong, but because we have defined normal to be what we are and since they are not like us, then they are abnormal. Supporters of the law want a certain semblance of human homogeneity. But we cannot legislate into existence a world that does not exist: the truth of our human condition is that we are a diverse, multi-faceted species. The measure of our humanity lies, in part, in how we think of those different from us. We cannot – should not – have empathy only for people who are like us.

Some supporters of the law have asked – what is next, a marriage between a man and a dog?’ Or ‘have you seen animals being gay?’ (Actually, studies show that there is homosexual behavior in many species of animals.) But, quite simply, people are not dogs, and to accept the premise – that a homosexual is comparable to an animal – is inhumane. We cannot reduce the humanity of our fellow men and women because of how and who they love. Some animals eat their own kind, others desert their young. Shall we follow those examples, too?

Other supporters suggest that gay men sexually abuse little boys. But pedophilia and homosexuality are two very different things. There are men who abuse little girls, and women who abuse little boys, and we do not presume that they do it because they are heterosexuals. Child molestation is an ugly crime that is committed by both straight and gay adults (this is why it is a crime: children, by virtue of being non-adults, require protection and are unable to give sexual consent).

There has also been some nationalist posturing among supporters of the law. Homosexuality is ‘unafrican,’ they say, and we will not become like the west. The west is not exactly a homosexual haven; acts of discrimination against homosexuals are not uncommon in the US and Europe. But it is the idea of ‘unafricanness’ that is truly insidious. Sochukwuma was born of Igbo parents and had Igbo grandparents and Igbo great-grandparents. He was born a person who would romantically love other men. Many Nigerians know somebody like him. The boy who behaved like a girl. The girl who behaved like a boy. The effeminate man. The unusual woman. These were people we knew, people like us, born and raised on African soil. How then are they ‘unafrican?’

If anything, it is the passage of the law itself that is ‘unafrican.’ It goes against the values of tolerance and ‘live and let live’ that are part of many African cultures. (In 1970s Igboland, Area Scatter was a popular musician, a man who dressed like a woman, wore makeup, plaited his hair. We don’t know if he was gay – I think he was – but if he performed today, he could conceivably be sentenced to fourteen years in prison. For being who he is.) And it is informed not by a home-grown debate but by a cynically borrowed one: we turned on CNN and heard western countries debating ‘same sex marriage’ and we decided that we, too, would pass a law banning same sex marriage. Where, in Nigeria, whose constitution defines marriage as being between a man and a woman, has any homosexual asked for same-sex marriage?

This is an unjust law. It should be repealed. Throughout history, many inhumane laws have been passed, and have subsequently been repealed. Barack Obama, for example, would not be here today had his parents obeyed American laws that criminalized marriage between blacks and whites.

An acquaintance recently asked me, ‘if you support gays, how would you have been born?’ Of course, there were gay Nigerians when I was conceived. Gay people have existed as long as humans have existed. They have always been a small percentage of the human population. We don’t know why. What matters is this: Sochukwuma is a Nigerian and his existence is not a crime.

By Chimamanda Adichie for The Scoop.
– Award winning writer, Chimamanda Adichie, wrote this piece exclusively for The Scoop

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On a breezy March day, the town mayor happened to stroll through the park where a small boy was flying the largest, most beautiful kite he had ever seen. It soared so high and floated so gently, the mayor was sure it must be visible from the next town. Since his little town did not have very many things of note to its credit, the mayor decided to award a “key to the city” to the one responsible for setting this spectacle aloft.

“Who is responsible for flying this kite?” the mayor inquired.

“I am,” said the boy. “I made the kite with my own hands. I painted all the beautiful pictures and constructed it with scraps I found in my father’s workshop. I fly the kite,” he declared.

“I am,” said the wind. “It is my whim that keeps it aloft and sets the direction it will go. Unless I blow, the kite will not fly at all. I fly the kite,” the wind cooed.

“Not so,” exclaimed the kite’s tail. “I make it sail and give it stability against the wind’s whims. Without me, the kite would spin out of control and not even the boy could save it from crashing to earth. I fly the kite,” declared the tail.

So, who flies the kite?

This week, remember that the kite flew high in the sky because of the team driving it.
Be a good team player.

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